ISSUE 2 + WRITERS IN CONVERSATION Blank.jpg

YVES OLADE

 

IN CONVERSATION

Yves Olade is a history student, living in the south of England. Published in the Rising Phoenix Review, his poetry is upcoming in Bombus Press and the Horn & Ivory zine, as well as others. An avid documentary fan, he hates driving and likes carnations. More of his poetry can be found at
YVESOLADE.TUMBLR.COM.

 

WHAT INSPIRED ONE OF YOUR POEMS?

Juda Reconsidered is a really interesting poem for me, because the inspiration for it was really clear. Usually, when I write a poem, I draw on a wide range of experiences, feelings, thoughts and emotions. I then try and draw them together to form a coherent whole -- something that works better at some times than at others. With Juda however, I can pinpoint the day I wrote it and the walk that inspired it. It was in my last week of my second term of university, and it had just been raining so there were puddles everywhere. The sky was this cornflower blue that reflected off the ground and the buildings; I was feeling such specific and distinct things. A lot of the details are very accurate also: I really do have those art prints & there really was a flower dying on the windowsill. I have, however, been inside the museum in question, and I couldn’t tell you how many steps were outside, but it probably isn’t 30.

TELL US AN OBSCURE THING YOU FIND INTERESTING ABOUT THE WORLD?

This is really weird, but there was a discussion a little while ago about whether or not/when people took shoes off in other people’s houses which I found really interesting. I don’t know if it’s the historian in me, but having people explain their personal and cultural customs, and then explaining the thought process behind those customs, I found was a really fascinating & unique look at mindsets and community.

WHAT ODD, FUNNY OR INTERESTING FACT CAN YOU SHARE ABOUT YOUR WRITING HABITS OR PROCESS?

I know that writing is a difficult & consistent process, but I really do have moods where what I produce is a lot better, and more interesting and unique than what I write otherwise. This is part of the reason that it sometimes takes me weeks, or even months, to write something I like. I try not to “wait” for one of these poetic feelings and waves to just arrive, but it can get really frustrating when I try and force it and nothing interesting seems to be happening, so my writing process can be really erratic.

HOW MUCH RESEARCH DO YOU DO WHEN WRITING?

 

It depends what I’m writing! I’d say I tend towards research, probably. I’m always thinking, is there a better word for this? or can I say this in another way? or what’s a red flower that has four syllables & grows in cold climates? Stuff like that. Research tends to come after the poem has been written and it’s mainly about details and imagery and word choice. It’s really minor, maybe no-one will notice if I write “vying” instead of “trying” but I think one word can change the mood of a poem. Even if it doesn’t, it makes the poem better for me, and more satisfying for me to have written.

LASTLY, WHAT COMES TO MIND WHEN YOU THINK KINGDOMS IN THE WILD?

My initial thoughts are about honesty, about genuineness and vulnerability. Seeing and portraying things as they were supposed to be, understanding them in their natural habitats, putting things in their rightful place. Evaluating and appreciating something on its own terms. To be “in the wild” is to act according to your nature.

ABOUT IN CONVERSATION

What makes a writer write? what resides behind the impulse to create a work of art?  We have always been interested in these questions here at KITW. Incredibly, we’ve received such varied responses to the same four questions from each of our published writers, that we thought we’d share.

We hope you enjoyed your visit to Kingdoms in the Wild, if you did, please tell a friend. Thank you for your support.

 

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